white supremacist

Fueling the Flames: Extremists’ Response to New Zealand Attacks

On March 15, suspected white supremacist extremist Brenton Harrison Tarrant, a 28-year-old Australian man, attacked two mosques, killing 50 and injuring 50 others in Christchurch, New Zealand. In the immediate days following the attacks, various international terrorist groups and other white supremacist extremists commented on the attack, either condemning and calling for revenge or showing their support.

In today’s podcast, our analysts will discuss how these various extremist groups have responded to this attack and implications for future threats.

2019 Threat Assessment Series: Domestic Terrorism - A Changing Environment

Domestic extremists’ wide-ranging ideologies pose unique challenges to New Jersey and the surrounding region, as they employ a variety of robust methods to conduct attacks, have varying motivations, and are often willing to engage in violence.

Tune in to the next installment of our 2019 Threat Assessment series as our analysts sit down and discuss the evolving tactics of domestic extremists in 2018 and what the threat landscape posed by these groups will look like this year.

Hate in Cyberspace: Online Platforms Provide Refuge for White Supremacist Extremists

Historically, white supremacist extremists have leveraged alternative social media platforms to promulgate their ideologies, interact with like-minded individuals online, and attempt to radicalize others. On October 27, Robert Bowers, a suspected white supremacist extremist who espoused anti-Semitic comments online, shot and killed 11 people and injured six at a synagogue in Pittsburgh. Prior to the attack, Bowers posted on Gab, a social media website that claims it is a free-speech alternative to Facebook and Twitter, that the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society “likes to bring invaders in that kill our people.” Additionally, Bowers shared other anti-Semitic and xenophobic content online, including a picture with the numbers “1488,” a numeric combination popular with white supremacists.

Join us as our analysts delve into how white supremacist extremists have used online platforms and how they leverage social media for various causes.

Episode 43: Displaying Hate - A Look at White Supremacist Extremist Imagery

White supremacist extremists often use imagery that can be broken down into four categories—traditional, religious, Nazi-related, and Internet-based—to convey their ideology, show support for a specific group, or intimidate minority populations. These symbols should not automatically be assumed to be hate-related, but should be evaluated in the context in which they are used.

Recently, our office partnered with the Anti-Defamation League to produce a comprehensive resource on the current imagery we are seeing in the white supremacist movement. Tune in as our analysts explore these symbols and their meanings.  

Episode 40: The Rise of #Vanguard #America

In the past six months, Vanguard America—a white supremacist group—has expanded beyond Internet-based activity to attending violent protests nationwide, distributing propaganda, and intimidating minority populations. The leader of the group claims there are approximately 200 members in 20 states, including New Jersey. 

Join Intelligence Analyst Paige Schilling and Analysis Bureau Chief Dean Baratta as they explore what this movement is all about and how their actions have impacted New Jersey.

Domestic Terrorism Conference Series: From Radicalization to Reconciliation, One Man’s Experience with White Supremacy (Part Two)

In May 2017, NJOHSP hosted over 250 federal, state, and local intelligence and law enforcement, academic, and private-sector partners for the 2nd Annual Domestic Terrorism Conference. The event provided a forum to discuss the threat of extremists and groups aligned with race-based, single-issue, anti-government, and religious ideologies in the United States. Over the last several weeks, you have heard from some of the experts who shared their research and insights at the conference.

In the final episode of the 2017 Domestic Terrorism Conference series, former white supremacist Frank Meeink discusses his radicalization process to extremism. His story provides an insight into white supremacist ideology, recruitment strategies, and his efforts to help others leave the movement.

Domestic Terrorism Conference Series: From Radicalization to Reconciliation, One Man’s Experience with White Supremacy (Part One)

In May 2017, NJOHSP hosted over 250 federal, state, and local intelligence and law enforcement, academic, and private-sector partners for the 2nd Annual Domestic Terrorism Conference. The event provided a forum to discuss the threat of extremists and groups aligned with race-based, single-issue, anti-government, and religious ideologies in the United States. Over the last several weeks, you have heard from some of the experts who shared their research and insights at the conference.

In the final episode of the 2017 Domestic Terrorism Conference series, former white supremacist Frank Meeink discusses his radicalization process to extremism. His story provides an insight into white supremacist ideology, recruitment strategies, and his efforts to help others leave the movement.