White Supremacist Extremists

Conspiracy Theory Likely Leads to Extremist Violence

Conspiracy Theory Likely Leads to Extremist Violence

White supremacist extremists will likely cite “white genocide” as justification for violence against certain religious communities being the only option to save the white race. Since 2018, there have been no New Jersey-based white supremacist extremist attacks; however, groups and individuals within the State continue to promote the conspiracy in person and online.

Domestic Extremists Embrace Foreign Terrorist Ideologies

Domestic Extremists Embrace Foreign Terrorist Ideologies

Some domestic extremists are likely willing to shift to foreign terrorist ideologies as a way to justify violence due to their susceptibility to radicalization, existing violent tendencies, and willingness to support extremist groups. An NJOHSP review found that many domestic extremist and foreign terrorist ideologies share similar viewpoints typically rooted in hatred and intolerance.

Online Manifestos Inspire Other Extremists

Online Manifestos Inspire Other Extremists

White supremacist extremists will likely consult online manifestos for ideological and tactical guidance due to the success of past attacks and their idolization of like-minded extremists. The manifesto of Anders Breivik, a white supremacist who killed over 70 people in Norway in 2011, has been the inspiration for multiple white supremacist extremists, including Christopher Hasson, who created a target list of high-profile media members and political figures.

Domestic Terrorism in 2018

Domestic Terrorism in 2018

There were 32 domestic terrorist attacks, disrupted plots, threats of violence, and weapons stockpiling by individuals with a radical political or social agenda who lack direction or influence from foreign terrorist organizations in 2018. NJOHSP defines domestic terrorism as violence committed by individuals or groups—including anti-government, race-based, religious, and single-issue extremist ideologies—associated primarily with US-based movements.

Online Platforms Provide Refuge for White Supremacist Extremists

Online Platforms Provide Refuge for White Supremacist Extremists

Historically, white supremacist extremists have leveraged alternative social media platforms to espouse their ideologies, interact with like-minded individuals online, and attempt to radicalize others. On October 27, Robert Bowers, a suspected white supremacist extremist who espoused anti-Semitic comments online, shot and killed 11 people and injured six at a synagogue in Pittsburgh.

Domestic Terrorism in the US, 2017

Domestic Terrorism in the US, 2017

In 2017, domestic terrorists were responsible for a total of 45 attacks, disrupted plots, threats of violence, and instances of weapons stockpiling, including four incidents in New Jersey. NJOHSP defines domestic terrorism as violence committed by individuals or groups—including race-based, single-issue, anti-government, and religious extremist ideologies—associated primarily with US-based movements.

White Supremacist Extremist Imagery

White supremacist extremists often use imagery that can be broken down into four categories—traditional, religious, Nazi-related, and Internet-based—to convey their ideology, show support for a specific group, or intimidate minority populations. These symbols should not automatically be assumed to be hate-related, but should be evaluated in the context in which they are used. 

The Face of White Supremacy in 2017

The Face of White Supremacy in 2017

To appeal to new audiences susceptible to its radical messaging, the national white supremacist movement has tried to deemphasize hate symbols and attacks against non-white communities. These organizations have “rebranded” since at least last year, when they took a more high-profile role with conferences and rallies, official statements, and recruitment efforts. 

Domestic Terrorism: 2015-Present

Domestic Terrorism: 2015-Present

Between January 2015 and May 1, 2017, there were 81 domestic terrorist attacks, disrupted plots, threats of violence, and weapons stockpiling by individuals with a radical political or social agenda who lack direction or influence from foreign terrorist organizations. These infographics compare different types of extremists, identify notable incidents, and highlight the targets and methods used by domestic terrorists with different ideologies.

White Supremacists: Rhetorical Shifts Unlikely to Deter Violence

White Supremacists: Rhetorical Shifts Unlikely to Deter Violence

To appeal to new audiences susceptible to its radical messaging, the national white supremacist movement has tried to deemphasize hate symbols and attacks against non-white communities. These organizations have attempted to “rebrand” since at least last year, when they took a more high-profile role with conferences and rallies, official statements, and recruitment efforts. 

Terrorist Attacks in the West, 2015

This infographic depicts terrorist attacks in North America, Western Europe, and Australia in 2015. There were 34 attacks with 642 people killed or wounded, and another 21 hostages later rescued.

Shooting in Charleston, South Carolina

There are no immediate threats to New Jersey resulting from last night’s shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, which claimed the lives of nine people. As of 1200 today, the suspect, 21-year old Dylann Storm Roof of Columbia, South Carolina, was arrested in Shelby, North Carolina. The stop was initiated after a citizen saw the suspect’s car and reported it to law enforcement. According to local media, Roof has a history of arrests on drug and trespassing charges.