Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs)

Domestic Extremists Embrace Foreign Terrorist Ideologies

Domestic Extremists Embrace Foreign Terrorist Ideologies

Some domestic extremists are likely willing to shift to foreign terrorist ideologies as a way to justify violence due to their susceptibility to radicalization, existing violent tendencies, and willingness to support extremist groups. An NJOHSP review found that many domestic extremist and foreign terrorist ideologies share similar viewpoints typically rooted in hatred and intolerance.

Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs) in the US, 2018

Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs) in the US, 2018

In 2018, there were eight attacks and plots in the United States, and nine other instances involving material support or other related offenses nationwide. Like colors indicate individuals who acted in coordination, and a white box signifies individuals who acted independently.

Homegrown Violent Extremists

Homegrown Violent Extremists

HVEs pose the greatest threat to New Jersey due to their presence in the United States, ability to conduct and plot attacks using simple methods, and susceptibility to online terrorist propaganda. An NJOHSP review has identified at least 179 HVEs between 2015-18, with 34 arrested in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania for conducting attacks, organizing plots, and providing material support to foreign terrorist groups, namely ISIS and al-Qa’ida.

Female HVEs Likely to Play Supportive Role for ISIS

Female HVEs Likely to Play Supportive Role for ISIS

ISIS’s female sympathizers in the United States are likely to provide material support as they encourage supporters to conduct attacks on the group’s behalf, fundraise for its operations overseas, and issue threatening rhetoric online. An NJOHSP review of 11 out of 13 incidents highlighted that female homegrown violent extremists (HVEs) supported ISIS, despite recruitment tactics targeting female sympathizers from other foreign terrorist organizations.

Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs) in the US, 2017

Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs) in the US, 2017

Homegrown violent extremists (HVEs) are individuals inspired—as opposed to directed—by a foreign terrorist organization and radicalized in the countries in which they are born, raised, or reside.

HVEs pose the greatest threat to New Jersey and will likely remain so this year.

New Propaganda Emphasizes Attacks at Large Gatherings

New Propaganda Emphasizes Attacks at Large Gatherings

Since the beginning of May, al-Qa’ida, as well as its affiliate al-Qa’ida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), and ISIS have disseminated new propaganda, encouraging homegrown violent extremists (HVEs) to target large gatherings and outdoor events in the United States during the summer months.

Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs) in the US, 2016

Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs) in the US, 2016

Homegrown violent extremists (HVEs) are individuals inspired—as opposed to directed—by a foreign terrorist organization and radicalized in the countries in which they are born, raised, or reside.

HVEs pose the greatest threat to New Jersey and will likely remain so this year.

Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs) in the US, 2015

Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVEs) are individuals inspired by foreign terrorist organizations and radicalized in the countries in which they are born, raised, or reside. In 2015, HVEs demonstrated an ability to operate in New Jersey and throughout the United States while connecting with like-minded individuals online and acting independently from organized terrorist groups. Since late 2014, a variety of radical groups such as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and al-Qa'ida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) have encouraged HVEs to attack in their home countries.

ISIS Capabilities - June to July 2015

Since the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) announced their self-proclaimed caliphate in June 2014, the group has expanded its presence throughout Iraq and Syria and has become a significant security threat to the United States by encouraging Homegrown Violent Extremists to execute attacks locally. In order to develop a deeper understanding of ISIS’s overall capabilities, a new joint counterterrorism assessment–produced by the State of New York and New Jersey — will examine key indicators that reflect the overall capabilities of the group. 

Chattanooga: Attack Underscores Threat to Military

In July 16, Air Force recruiters witnessed a white male pull up in front of a National Guard recruiting center in a strip mall in Chattanooga and fire 25 to 30 rounds at the office with an automatic rifle. Local authorities pursued the shooter to the NOSC, approximately 7.5 miles from the first shooting site.