Anarchist Extremists

Domestic Terrorism in 2018

Domestic Terrorism in 2018

There were 32 domestic terrorist attacks, disrupted plots, threats of violence, and weapons stockpiling by individuals with a radical political or social agenda who lack direction or influence from foreign terrorist organizations in 2018. NJOHSP defines domestic terrorism as violence committed by individuals or groups—including anti-government, race-based, religious, and single-issue extremist ideologies—associated primarily with US-based movements.

Anarchist Extremists

Anarchist Extremists

Anarchist extremists will mobilize in response to issues they believe are unjust, carry out criminal and violent acts during otherwise First Amendment-protected events and protests, and target perceived enemies. Throughout 2018, anarchist extremists were actively engaged in criminal activities in the tri-state region, resulting in at least 20 arrests.

Domestic Terrorism in the US, 2017

Domestic Terrorism in the US, 2017

In 2017, domestic terrorists were responsible for a total of 45 attacks, disrupted plots, threats of violence, and instances of weapons stockpiling, including four incidents in New Jersey. NJOHSP defines domestic terrorism as violence committed by individuals or groups—including race-based, single-issue, anti-government, and religious extremist ideologies—associated primarily with US-based movements.

Domestic Terrorism: 2015-Present

Domestic Terrorism: 2015-Present

Between January 2015 and May 1, 2017, there were 81 domestic terrorist attacks, disrupted plots, threats of violence, and weapons stockpiling by individuals with a radical political or social agenda who lack direction or influence from foreign terrorist organizations. These infographics compare different types of extremists, identify notable incidents, and highlight the targets and methods used by domestic terrorists with different ideologies.

Anarchists: Targeting North Dakota Access Pipeline

Anarchists: Targeting North Dakota Access Pipeline

Anarchist extremists are protesting the North Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and aiding in the destruction of pipeline construction material, resulting in transport disruptions in at least two states. DAPL is a $3.7-billion project to build a pipeline from North Dakota to Illinois, where crude oil would be transported to refineries on the Gulf or East Coast. It is unlikely this activity will impact New Jersey pipeline projects because no New Jersey-based companies are directly supporting the DAPL project.

Proposed Energy Pipelines: Minimal Impact to New Jersey

The proposed Dakota Access and Keystone XL Pipelines pose little impact to New Jersey due to the State’s robust, independent infrastructure and the lack of credible threats from anarchist or environmental extremist groups. The Dakota Access Pipeline will transport crude oil from the Bakken shale oil fields in northwest North Dakota to a terminal in Illinois, where it will travel to refineries on the Gulf of Mexico and the Midwest. The Keystone XL Pipeline is a proposed project awaiting US State Department approval, which will provide a more direct route to transport crude oil from Alberta to Nebraska.