New York City Vehicle-Ramming Attack

Yesterday, an ISIS-inspired individual carried out an attack in Lower Manhattan, killing eight and injuring 12, according to initial reports. This is the first vehicle-ramming incident a homegrown violent extremist has conducted in the United States since November 2016, when Abdul Artan drove his car into pedestrians on Ohio State University’s campus, injuring 11.

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  • The incident occurred at approximately 3:00 p.m., when the suspect—identified as Sayfullo Saipov, 29—drove down a bike path along the Hudson River, striking pedestrians and cyclists in a rented pickup truck before colliding with a school bus. Following the crash, police fired shots in response to Saipov exiting the vehicle and displaying a paintball and a pellet gun, while shouting “Allahu akbar.” 
     
  • Although ISIS has not claimed responsibility for the attack, authorities recovered a note from the truck, claiming Saipov acted on behalf of ISIS. In November 2016, ISIS used its English-language magazine Rumiyah to promote the use of vehicles in operations. This tactic was used in Europe, most recently in Barcelona and London. 

There are no known or credible threats to New Jersey as a result of the New York attack. Nonetheless, NJOHSP provides training in terrorism and awareness prevention, active shooter incidents, homemade explosives awareness and response, complex coordinated attack response, and New Jersey’s threat environment.

  • NJOHSP facilitates physical security site assessments in coordination with county infrastructure coordinators, risk mitigation planners, and law enforcement. It also compiles a list of special events scheduled throughout the state. To share information on upcoming events in your jurisdiction, submit a Special Events Form at www.njohsp.gov/specialevents
     
  • We encourage New Jersey’s residents to report suspicious activity to local law enforcement and to NJOHSP by calling 1-866-4-SAFE-NJ or by emailing tips@njohsp.gov

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES


For more information, please contact NJOHSP's Analysis Bureau at analysis@njohsp.gov or 609-584-4000.